MLA Introduction Part 2

MLA: General Format

Times New Roman, 12 point font, 1-inch margins

Last name and page number on each page header

Let’s look at an example:

Jane Doe

Ms. Margaret Smith

English II

06 Mar. 2018

Title of the Paper

When to Quote sources Directly

Quoting sources (articles, books, websites, etc.) directly is great—you are using evidence directly from the researcher’s mouth. However, there is a time and place for quoting sources directly.

You want to only quote sources directly when they say something to further your argument in a way in which you cannot. In other words: use something interesting. Students are often quoting at will and random and the quotes they choose are not interesting and don’t add anything to their overall paper.

In-text citations

While you are writing your paper, you will have to give reference to sources after you have used the information you’ve gather from them. This is the basic format:

“Blah, blah, blah, quote” (Author Page Number)

“Blah, blah, blah, quote” (Johnson 97)

Notice: NO PUNCTUATION between the end of the quote and in the in-text citation. You fill follow this format EVERY TIME.

Also notice: no comma between author’s last name and page number.

In-text citations: Variations

An even better way to cite sources within your paper is to use the author’s name in your sentence and then just include the page number at the end of your quote. For example:

According to Elizabeth Rudell, “Students tend to connect better to teachers who are vulnerable in their academic struggles and successes” (97).

Since you’ve stated the author’s name in your actual sentence, you do NOT have to repeat the same information later on.

 Websites and/or no page number

­In this style, you would use author last name and then the article title

­For example

“Blah, blah, blah, quote” (Johnson “Students Relationships”)

No known author

­In this instance, you would use article title

­For example…

“Blah, blah, blah” (“Student Relationships”)

Basic In-Text Citations: Book

1.“They were all around in a circle watching and laughing at the way we were doing the steps” (Keyes 41).

2.Daniel Keyes writes, “They were watching all around in a circle watching and laughing at the way we were doing the steps” (41).

3.In his novel, Flowers for Algernon, Daniel Keyes writes, “They were watching all around in a circle watching and laughing at the way we were doing the steps” (41).

In case you missed the first part, here it is!